Weekly Article: How should this medicine be used?

How should this medicine be used?

Prednisone is used for many different indications including: asthma, COPD, CIDP, rheumatic disorders, allergic disorders, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, adrenocortical insufficiency, hypercalcemia due to cancer, thyroiditis, laryngitis, severe tuberculosis, urticaria (hives), lipid pneumonitis, pericarditis, multiple sclerosis, nephrotic syndrome, lupus, myasthenia gravis, poison oak exposure, Meniere’s disease, and as part of a drug regimen to prevent rejection after organ transplant.[1]

Prednisone has also been used in the treatment of migraine headaches and cluster headaches and for severe aphthous ulcer. Prednisone is used as an antitumor drug.[2] It is important in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and other hormone-sensitive tumors, in combination with other anticancer drugs.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Prednisone is also used for the treatment of the Herxheimer reaction, which is common during the treatment of syphilis, and to delay the onset of symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and also for uveitis. The mechanism for the delay of symptoms is unknown. Because it suppresses the adrenal glands, it is also sometimes used in the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Prednisone is also used to treat sarcoidosis.

Prednisone can also be used in the treatment of decompensated heart failure to potentiate renal responsiveness to diuretics, especially in heart failure patients with refractory diuretic resistance with large dose of loop diuretics.[3][4][5][6][7][8] The mechanism is prednisone, as a glucocorticoid, can improve renal responsiveness to atrial natriuretic peptide by increasing the density of natriuretic peptide receptor type A in the renal inner medullary collecting duct, inducing a potent diuresis.

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